PLURIVERSALE I

 

THE FOREST AND THE SCHOOL: WHERE TO SIT AT THE DINNER TABLE?

THE CONCEPT OF ANTROPOFAGIA IN BRAZILIAN THOUGHT AND ITS PHILOSOPHICAL, ECOLOGICAL, AND COSMOPOLITICAL INFLUENCE

 

Panel discussion, book launch, and film program
A project by: Pedro Neves Marques

 

27 –29 11 2014
NEW VENUE: Temporary Gallery, Mauritiuswall 35, 50676 Cologne
Tickets: 3 €

 

The Forest and The School / Where to sit at the dinner table? is co-published by Archive Books and the Academy of the Arts of the World. Edited by the writer and visual artist Pedro Neves Marques, it is the first comprehensive anthology in English about the Brazilian tradition of Antropofagia, understood here not simply as an aesthetic movement but a South American cosmopolitical philosophy. As a critical and revolutionary idea, Antropofagia was based, in part, on the Anthropophagic Manifesto, written in 1928 by Oswald de Andrade. Instead of rejecting the dominant Western culture, Antropofagia makes use of the concept of anthropophagy—literally, cannibalism—to call for the predation and transformative digestion of modernity's paradigmatic divides of nature and culture, of human and animal, object and subject, as well as uses of labor and technology.

 

The book brings together sixteenth-century chronicles about indigenous an-thropophagic rituals, seminal texts from the modernist Antropofagia movement by Oswald de Andrade, Flávio de Carvalho, or Raul Bopp; writings by Glauber Rocha and Hélio Oiticica; as well as anthropological texts by the likes of Pierre Clastres, Bruno Latour, and Eduardo Viveiros de Castro. These source readings are followed by more recent or newly commissioned texts confronting Antropofagia with multinaturalist perspectivism, the ecological promise of the Declaration of the Rights of Nature, and the centrality of indigenous peoples in current political struggles. 

 

The book launch will unfold into a discussion as well as a film program curated by Pedro Neves Marques. While the discussion will address the different ecologies and genealogies found in the publication, the film program will expand from Brazilian cinema and the visual arts to include the screening of historical documents, weird images, and appropriated material; most probably in a deformed, autophagic form.

 

 

PEDRO NEVES MARQUES is a writer and visual artist who lives and works in Lisbon. His film Where to sit at the dinner table?, in which he articulates Amerindian cosmologies with the history of economics and ecology, premiered at the DocLisboa 11th International Film Festival last year. He has exhibited at venues such as 12th Cuenca Bienal (Cuenca, 2014), SculptureCenter (New York, 2014), e-flux (New York, 2013), and EDP Foundation (Lisbon, 2010). He is the author of a collection of short stories titled The Integration Process (Lisbon/Berlin, Atlas Projectos, 2012).

 

 

PROGRAMM

 

THU  27 11 2014, 19:00

 

BOOK LAUNCH

 

THE FOREST AND THE SCHOOL: WHERE TO SIT AT THE DINNER TABLE?
With editor Pedro Neves Marques

 

FILM SCREENINGS 

 

PHASMIDES
Dir.: Daniel Steegmann Mangrané, Brasil 2013, 22' 41''.
Courtesy of the artist.

 

Phasmides follows a family of stick insects camouflaged in a complex, geometric set designed by the artist. In a series of highly abstract shots, wherein the insects’ silhouettes appear and disappear, Steegmann Mangrané intimates the instability and fragility of the cinematic image. Over the course of the film, geometric forms become organic and organic forms reveal their geometry; living bodies come to seem inanimate and the inanimate latent with life.

 

MATER DOLORSA II
Dir.: Roberto Evangelista, Brasil 1978, 11’
Courtesy of the artist.

 

In this poetic essay, filmed at Lake Arara on the Rio Negro (Amazon), the artist reflects on the “creation and survival of forms.” The critique in the video takes aim at the destruction of the environment and the economic exploitation of the local population. The concepts of “the country drowning” and “the shipwreck of culture”, derived from Hélio Oiticica, are poetically materialized in the calabashes, a species of fruit typical of the region, which float in the river and are molded by the water current.

 

FRI 28 11 2014, 19:00

 

FILM SCREENINGS

 

ILHA DAS FLORES
Dir.: Jorge Furtado, Brasil 1989, 13'.

 

This film follows a tomato from the plantation to the supermarket to the kitchen and eventually to the dump. Jorge Furtado uses this trip to analyze the economic, environmental, social, and ethical crisis in Brazilian society. Through Furtado’s logical analysis, the fate of a tomato leads viewers to the Ilha das Flores (Island of Flowers), a rubbish dump in Porto Alegre. The dump is connected to Mr Suzuki’s tomato field and Mrs Anete’s perfume, as well as to the free-enterprise economy and the world market in general, all of which is illustrated by the film in an ironic and often bitter, sarcastic way.

 

O CINEMA FALADO
Dir.: Caetano Veloso, Brasil 1986, 112’,

 

Brazil’s leading composer and singer ventures into filmmaking, revealing himself with family and friends in thirty segments arranged in three chapters—literature, music, and pictorial art. From the cacophony of a large party, dialogs start forming and, in a variety of settings, encompass themes that range from German philosophy to avant-garde theatre, classical poetry and current politics, family love and homosexuality. Music is present everywhere, in theater and dance, from Brazilian tunes to British rock. The film is a personal essay, explicitly referencing works by Godard and Fellini.

 

 

 

SAT 29 11 2014, 19:00

 

FILM SCREENING

 

A IDADE DA TERRA
Dir.: Glauber Rocha, Brasil 1980, 140’

 

“A Idade da Terra (The Age of the Earth) dissolves narrative cinema without giving up on those infrastructural discourses through which the main characteristics of the so-called Third World are materialized: imperialism, dark forces, massacres of indigenous peoples, Catholic faith, revolutionary militarism, urban terrorism, the prostitution of the haute bourgeoisie, the uprisings of women, the prostitutes turning into saints and the saints turning into revolutionaries. The film reveals all this in the magnificent set of Brazilian history, focusing on its three capital cities: Bahia, Brasilia, and Rio. Set in the future, the film reveals a new form of art that can be compared to what Villa-Lobos, Portinari, Di Cavalcanti or Picasso created. This movie is a symphony in sound and pictures—or an anti-symphony—that deals with elementary problems. It is a portrait of myself and a portrait of Brazil.” Glauber Rocha

 

 

 

 

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